Posts by Robrecht

    Old thread, but I didn't want to start a new one because this one contains relevant info.

    The smoothing of continuous MIDI parameters still confuses me. We use volume automation (CC#7) to make sure that staccato breaks with high-gain guitars are whisper quiet in all possible live circumstances.

    The easiest would be to simply create a step in volume (CC#7 = 0 for quite, CC#7 = 127 for loud) and rely on the Kemper's smart smoothing to avoid a click, as described by CK here:

    After a second, when no message was received, the algorithm will create a step.
    However, the step will not be absolutely steep, to prevent a click.

    However, in some circumstances, a much more agressive smoothing algorithm seems to kick in that turns the step into a slow swell, which is not what we want.

    I've tried to avoid this by replacing the single step with a steep ramp (which, since MIDI is discrete, actually consists of a number of intermediate steps). My thinking was that this should resemble a quick movement of a physical MIDI volume pedal, and that the more guided approach with intermediate values would force the Kemper to follow closely without excessive smoothing.

    Unfortunately, in some songs, were still getting a slow (or delayed) swell. Here's an example where I've tried the ramp approach. The screenshot shows a single measure. The tempo is 94 bpm, so the quiet part between the second and third beats lasts less than a second. Volume should be back to max just before the third beat (for my attack of the chord to be audible), but in practice, it comes up so slowly that it takes until around the fourth beat to fade in.

    Crazy thing is that this pattern is repeated for a number of measures, and the unwanted smoothing only happens the first time.

    So, I'm still wondering what the algorithm is actually looking for to decide between a step (minimal smoothing) and a swell (audible fade-in). I guess I don't understand this part:

    After a second, when no message was received, the algorithm will create a step.

    The algorithm can't look into the future. If it needs to wait for a whole second to decide to create a step, doesn't that mean it will always be late, and can only decide that it should have created a step a second ago? Or does it create a step unless the last message was less than one second in the past?

    TLDR: What MIDI should I feed the Kemper to make these automations more predictable?

    Thanks - this was my current understanding exactly.

    Ah OK. In that case, I would say that when you've found an offset that works, I wouldn't worry about absolute precision too much. Once you get in the ballpark of compensating for that 4.9 ms delay, you're out of the audible range of latency and a couple of samples earlier or later won't make a difference.


    In most cases, the DI signal would only be reamped once, and would be muted afterwards, right? So you wouldn't run the risk of two copies derived from the same signal being out of phase to each other. If you are reamping the same DI twice (for a dual amp sound), just make sure to use "Constant latency" and offset them both by the same number of samples.

    "Constant latency" on KPA makes no difference.

    I suppose i can use Reapers "Output manual offset" feature to get the tracks roughly aligned, but it doesn't feel very precise.

    "Constant latency" is not supposed to fix the delay (your signal is sent through digital processing, which will always come with some latency) but it does make it easier to fix it.

    Without it, the Kemper tries to minimize latency, which is good for live playing, but also means that latency depends on the effects used, and thus differs from rig to rig. With "Constant latency" on, the delay is always the same (I seem to remember it was 4.9 milliseconds), regardless of the current effects settings. That way, once you've figured out the correct offset, you can set it and forget it.

    If you want to be very precise, use "Constant latency" and calculate the offset as follows (please correct me if I'm wrong here):

    Code
    Your project's sampling frequency in kHz * 4.9 ms

    For instance, at 44.1 kHz:

    Code
    44.100 kHz * 4.9 ms = 216 samples

    Of course, your audio interface may introduce a bit of extra latency. I don't know Reaper very well, but many DAWs have a way to figure this out and compensate for it across the board.

    In any case, once you've figured out a good offset value, it should remain the same as long as you stick with "Constant latency".

    The global noise gate, the one with a dedicated physical knob, is set independently for Browse mode and for Performance mode. It specifically targets the kind of hum you're hearing.

    My first hunch would be that you have it set to a lower value in Performance mode than in Browse mode.

    I think the request is about the internal output source going to the headphone jack. The signal on the headphone jack always reflects the output settings for Main Out. In some cases, it might be useful to hear one of the other output signals there. Say you're playing a wet-dry-wet setup, where the Main Output is set to wet only, but you also want to use the headphone jack for monitoring.

    Hello! This is the video for by band My Lament's single "My Mausoleum", from the album "The Season Came Undone". It's a very meaningful song to us personally, the lyrics are in the description on YouTube.

    External Content www.youtube.com
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    Through the activation of external content, you agree that personal data may be transferred to third party platforms. We have provided more information on this in our privacy policy.

    And of course our previously shared single "November", lyric video below, is a great soundtrack for these rainy days!
    ________________

    Previous update – September's here, the whole album (still with all Kemper guitars of course!) is now out globally.

    You can order the CD Digipack with lyrics through our label, Ardua Music, or read an extensive review ("one of the best death/doom albums 2023 has yet produced") and our own personal notes on No Clean Singing.

    ________________

    Original message – My band My Lament has a new single out, with a full album coming in September. All Kemper guitars of course!

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    Through the activation of external content, you agree that personal data may be transferred to third party platforms. We have provided more information on this in our privacy policy.

    Check it out (and add it to your library or playlists) on Spotify, YouTube Music or Apple Music!

    IMO, the Tonestack will replicate exactly your amp's board and behaviors when you touch at a button. It was the original criticism...

    In TJ vid, you can see that the few parameters we see, some turns greyed when he changes amp sims....

    I assume an amp with only two buttons wil be replicate with only two parameters allowed...

    Specifically, the BrightCap parameter turns grey for "Nrm" models and is enabled for "Brt" or "Topbst" ones. But yes, it will be interesting to see how models will be made for amps that don't have the classic "Gain/Bass/Mid/Treble" knob set. My old red Carlsbro GLX 150T head has five tone knobs!

    Michael_dk Check the YouTube video (it goes up to 4K so you can read the Kemper Stage screen clearly).

    For those willing to speculate, here are the parameters visible:

    Button 1Button 2Button 3Button 4
    Restore GainRestore Amp ModelRestore EQBurn (long press)
    0.0[see list]10.0Off
    Generic GainAmp ModelBrightCap Int.Gain Pot Ref.
    Knob 1Knob 2Knob 3Knob 4

    That's a lot of the classics covered already, at just half of the total of about 40 models CK mentioned.

    On the other hand, plenty of brands are still missing from what we've seen: Peavey, Mesa/Boogie, Orange, Dumble, Bogner, Soldano, Engl, Diezel... Some of those will undoubtedly be among the remaining 20, but with normal and bright variants included, maybe 40 won't feel like that much after all. :/ Still, definitely a good start, those Marshalls alone – sorry, Marses – are enough to keep me happy.

    There will still be a reason to make multiple Studio Profiles of an amplifier. Microphone choice and placement will continue to have a great influence on the sound of a profile.

    Exactly, the value of a profile set will be more in the skill and resources (mics, cabs...) of the maker than in their patience to go through every combination of knob increments.

    Of course, thanks to Merged Profiles, even a badly mic'ed amp can be saved by switching to a better cab section. Merged and Liquid Profiles together make me much more confident that I'd be able to make a usable profile myself, even without any experience or expensive gear.

    1. Fan Twins Rev Nrm Fender Twin Reverb
    2. Fan Twins Rev BrtFender Twin Reverb w. Bright Switch
    3. Fan D'Lux Rev NrmFender Delux Reverb
    4. Fan D'Lux Rev TremFender Delux Reverb w. Bright Switch
    5. Fan Vibr. Lux NrmFender Vibro Deluxe
    6. Fan Vibr. Lux BrtFender Vibro Deluxe w. Bright Switch
    7. Fan Vibr. ChampionFender Vibro Champ
    8. Fan BM NrmFender Bassman
    9. Voice Ace 15 TopbstVox AC 15 w. Top Boost
    10. Voice Ace 30 NrmVox AC 30
    11. Voice Ace 30 TopbstVox AC 30 w. Tob Boost

    As I'm not really into Fender or Vox amps, I'm not sure if I got everything right. Please correct me, if I'm wrong.

    Some more in the original video and in this demo:

    1. Fan Twins Rev NrmFender Twin Reverb
    2. Fan Twins Rev BrtFender Twin Reverb w. Bright Switch
    3. Fan D'Lux Rev NrmFender Delux Reverb
    4. Fan D'Lux Rev TremFender Delux Reverb w. Bright Switch
    5. Fan Vibr. Lux NrmFender Vibro Deluxe
    6. Fan Vibr. Lux BrtFender Vibro Deluxe w. Bright Switch
    7. Fan Vibr. ChampionFender Vibro Champ
    8. Fan BM NrmFender Bassman
    9. Voice Ace 15 TopbstVox AC 15 w. Top Boost
    10. Voice Ace 30 NrmVox AC 30
    11. Voice Ace 30 TopbstVox AC 30 w. Tob Boost
    12.-13 Roll Land Chor Nrm & BrtRoland Jazz Chorus (with & without Bright Switch)
    14-15. Mars TM 45 Nrm & BrtMarshall JTM45 (with & without Bright Switch)
    16-17. Mars Plex Nrm & BrtMarshall Plexi (with & without Bright Switch)
    18. Mars CM 800Marshall JCM800
    19-20. Fried Man Cln Nrm & BrtFriedman (with & without Bright Switch)
    21. Fried Man B+EFriedman BE preamp?
    22. Fried Man H+B+EFriedman HBE preamp?
    23-24. Oranje Overdose 1 & 2Orange Overdrive

    That's a lot of the classics covered already, at just over half of the total of about 40 models CK mentioned.

    I'm just excited to have the gain knob be more realistic and hoping it will prevent having to load up additional profiles to lower/increase the gain. If it does that, then I will be happy with the update.

    I think that's the essence of it. If Liquid Profiles work as advertised, they should eliminate the "each profile is just a snapshot" limitation of the Kemper. The update is not about better sound (which is subjective anyway), and I think "authenticity" is not the best way to describe the benefits either, although you could say the tone stack models will allow profiles to be tweaked more "authentically" (but who cares as long as it sounds good?).

    I think the main benefit will be that the decisions and conditions at the moment of profiling will become less limiting. Say I only have access to a certain amp for a short amount of time (because I'm planning to sell it, or because I'm borrowing it). A good amp will have a lot of different sweet spots to be discovered, and at any time, who knows what other settings would sound good too! Until now, there was always the pressure to cover all of them, because those snapshots were all you had left once the original amp was gone. If you failed to profile a particular sweet spot, it would not be possible to exactly recreate or discover it starting from other profiles.

    With Liquid Profiles, that worry should be over. You will only need to profile an amp once, not even worrying too much about settings, and that profile will include even those sweet spots you don't know yet. :huh: At least in theory, at least for those tone stacks for which a model exists.

    So that's the promise. I don't care too much about authenticity for its own sake, but the idea that you can now profile an amp's full potential instead of just specific snapshots sounds pretty cool.

    Is USB recording unilateral or am I able to use the high end headphone out of the KPA whilst recording? Problem is I do not own monitors so my focusrite would still be needed anyway and therefore I still could carry on using spidf…

    I think it would go both ways, like a full audio interface.

    In any case, you would have the option of direct monitoring your guitar before it goes into the computer. But I assume you are asking about audio coming out of the computer, like the other tracks playing in your DAW.

    In the video, we saw four channels going from the Kemper into the computer. That would be an improvement in itself, as S/PDIF only provides two input channels so you can't combine a stereo signal with an additional DI signal. With four channels of USB audio, you wouldn't have to choose anymore.

    But Christoph Kemper also said in the video he uses the Kemper for recreational listening now, taking advantage of its excellent analog outputs. That would suggest the USB connection is able to receive and convert digital audio from a computer. So, both ways!

    All speculation of course, going from the video! 😀

    yeah, and?...
    So what lol be it. Por que no los dos

    Oh of course, I meant it as a good thing! The profile sellers will survive, they still have their unique amp and mic collections and good ears. I just think it's really cool that the user value of a single profile as a representation of a certain analog amp will increase by so much. The whole system with having to do dozens of separate profiles to cover all knob settings was always a bit cumbersome.

    (All of this is ignoring the fact that right now, without Liquid Profiling, the Kemper's gain and EQ knobs already work very well in many circumstances! You can get a great variety of sounds from a single profile, even if it moves away from the original amp.)

    This should also cut out the issue* where someone profiles sweet spots on an amp by dialling in tones with a Strat in pick up position 1, but you the buyer are going to use an archtop style guitar to play the profiles. It shouldn't matter anymore with Liquid Profiling, whether the baseline profile was set to tame an ice pick sounding Strat, as you can tweak the Gain and Tone to suit the guitar you are using just like you would with a standard amp.

    This is a very good point I think. In general, it seems Liquid Profiling (like merged profiles before it) will make the decisions involved in profiling a little less defining and make profiles less snapshot-like. Cab choice, mic choice and placement, and now knob settings and the guitar used for tweaking them will no longer restrict what you retain from the original amp.